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What type of cat is best for me?

Do you want a lap cat, a cat to play with or a cat that does its own thing? One with a long coat or short? There is a huge number of cats to choose from, so we will lend a helping hand by discussing a number of features that characterise various breeds. Discover what type of cat is best for you.

Affectionate cat breeds

When deciding on a cat, ask yourself whether or not you want a lap cat. If so, it is important to socialise your cat properly as a kitten. Lure your cat onto your lap with kibble and play with him regularly. The animal will get to know you well and will enjoy spending time with you. Whether or not it will turn out a real lap cat, largely depends on the character. This is more difficult to anticipate in a mixed breed cat. Breeds known for their social behaviour and likely to enjoy your lap are the Ragdoll, Persian, Cornish Rex and Chantilly-Tiffany.

Cats that need little maintenance

Cats such as the Norwegian Forest Cat and the Maine Coon have long fur and a full coat. These breeds require regular combing and brushing. Can’t muster the time? Opt for a short-coated cat or a nude cat such as the Cornish Rex or Sphynx. ‘Regular’ housecats have a short coat which makes them less high-maintenance. When shedding its coat, you can help a short-coated cat by brushing it. Apart from that, short-coated cats don’t need any help maintaining their coat.

Cats suitable to be left alone

Whatever cat you choose, they are generally OK with being left alone. As long as there is enough food, water and toys. The Siamese is a cat breed known for disliking being left alone.

Costs of a pedigree cat

Pedigree cats are a lot more expensive than mixed breeds. A pedigree cat may set you back between 300 and 900 Euro, while a housecat will be anywhere between 0 and 50 Euro.

Forty different breeds: which one will you choose?

Over forty registered cat breeds exist, varying from small to large. The character and coat also differ per breed. As a lot of kittens are born as mixed breeds, it isn’t always straightforward to anticipate how a cat will develop. Claims that fur, colour and character may correlate – for example, the calico is said to have a fierce personality – are not scientifically backed. It is difficult to predict how your cat will turn out, because cats are individuals too.

Problems associated with pedigree cats

When opting for a pedigree cat, keep in mind that a lot of breeds suffer from genetic deficits or may develop them later in life due to poor breeding practices. A lot of information is available online about health issues associated with various cat breeds.

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